Sipho Mabuse at the South African Style Awards 2022/3

The South African Style Awards 2022/3 brought to you by PLASCON South Africa.

This is not about the clothes you wear!!!

The South African Style Awards celebrates individuals who have, in their respective career fields, disrupted the creative process of business.

This year, the South African Style Awards celebrates its 25th anniversary.

Last night 13 illustrious winners were announced at an intimate dinner hosted at the Zebra Square Gallery, dealers in classic cars, future classics and super cars located in Hyde Park Corner Shopping Centre, the quintessential ‘destination centre’ for discerning shoppers, housing luxury brands and fine dining establishments.

From Most Innovative Style to Style Icon, the winners include:

Most Innovative Style winner: Acclaimed content creator and business woman, Kim Jayde

Most Stylish Performing Artist in Film/TV winner Nambitha Ben-Mazwi

Most Stylish Performing Artist in Music winner Boity Thulo

Most Stylish Media Personality winner Leanne Manas

Most Stylish Fashion Designer winner Craig Jacobs

Most Stylish Model winner Rosette Ncwana

Most Stylish Business Personality winners Jeff and Teddy Zaki

Most Stylish Couple winners Lamiez Holworthy and Khuli Chana

Most Stylish Changemaker winner Refilwe Modiselle

The Next Big Thing winners Galaletsang Tshungu, also known as Halle Robinson and Lebo George Molaolwa, also known as Lebo Molax

SA Style Awards Achievement in Business Award winner Lerato Kganyago

Style Icon winner Sipho ‘Hotstix’ Mabuse,

Biko Mabuse in pics attended the event with his dad.

Our winners and guests toasted with VALDO by Vinitalia and received luxurious gifts from Panier des Sens, a sensorial brand of French origin that embraces eco-friendly values and is passionate about sustainability.

 The dinner was a prelude to the much anticipated and highly acclaimed SA Style Awards ceremony to be held on 12th February 2023 with a nod to the international awards season. 

 “PLASCON South Africa is proud to be part of the SA Style Awards 2022/3.

 Style is inspired by a palette and variation of hues, making this a perfect collaboration between these two iconic brands SA STYLE AWARDS x PLASCON. This year’s winners each unique in their choice of tones, colour their world with creativity and individuality, acknowledged by the SA STYLE AWARDS.” – explains  Suvasin Moodley, PLASCON South Africa Head of Decorative Marketing.

Music Exchange 2022: The Economics, Politics and Biology of the Music Industry

Music Exchange 2022: From left: Martin Myers, Mark Rosin, Marc Marot and Trevor Jones standing in front of the MEX sign at the Academy of Sound Engineering (ASE) in District Six, Cape Town.
Music Exchange 2022: From left: Martin Myers, Mark Rosin, Marc Marot and Trevor Jones standing in front of the MEX sign at the Academy of Sound Engineering (ASE) in District Six, Cape Town.

By Rachel Reynolds

I was driving home when I tuned into Smile FM and happened upon a man speaking about a conference this coming weekend at which industry ‘heavy weights’ were going to be present. The incredulity in his voice as he spoke, unable to believe that so many artists were passing up this opportunity to attend the conference, made me listen more closely – what was the catch? He spoke of Trevor Jones, a composer who scored Notting Hill, being one of the keynote speakers, and mentioned that the conference would be an intimate gathering of no more than 50 people. The tickets must be astronomical, —I thought.

When I got home, I immediately checked the price: R250. Just a little more than I would pay to see a modern-day Notting Hill in the cinema, for a two-day experience and chance to meet Trevor Jones as well as Marc Marot, former MD of Island Records who signed bands like Massive Attack, PJ Harvey, and The Cranberries.

I spent this small amount to attend what turned out to be one of the most inspiring and insightful weekends of my year—this coming from a woman who has travelled to six countries in the past six months.

Though I can’t possibly translate the experience of the weekend on to paper for you (though an amazingly successful poet – Siphokazi Jonas – who also featured at the conference probably could), I will try my best to deliver the most important points of contention to artists who couldn’t, but should’ve, made it.

It is not for the public to know what they want

Marot is adamant that this is the truth. The public don’t know what they want—you must show them what they want. Steve Jobs was used as a case in point, as he knew the only reason the public didn’t say they wanted a choice between 50 font types was because they didn’t know that such a thing was possible. This was in sharp contrast to how Eb Inglis, KFM host, described radio’s operational structure; rather than playing what they deem the public should be listening to, stations survey their listeners and play what is on demand instead.

The room breathed a collective sigh of relief when Inglis clarified that this didn’t necessarily mean artists should pander to society’s current craze, but rather keep making unique art and work hard on promoting themselves. He made a point of informing the listeners that radio wasn’t the platform to do this.

It might not be your art that is unsuccessful, but that the platform you use to justify its success needs to change

Many people think the radio can make or break an artist, and musicians will send their tracks to a station with high hopes, only to be ghosted. The reason for this is found in people’s misunderstanding of the age-old question that plagues us all: Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Or in this case, radio or success? Inglis makes it clear that, while radio used to play a pivotal role in initiating the popularity of songs, the advent of social media has meant its role has changed. Rather, the radio plays what has already been made popular through other platforms, such as Tik Tok, Twitter, Instagram and even Facebook. Here the answer is sometimes the chicken comes first, and sometimes the egg—depending on the decade you’re farming in. Or, in this case, making music.

Caveat subscriptor

Woven between the economics of the entertainment industry, is of course law and politics. My music producer friend sat next to me, mouth agape, as Nick Matzukis explained more than 15 types of royalties that can be earned from a single piece of music. He insisted, “There is money in art folks – if only everyone knew!” This led to a discussion of contracts and the bad things that happen when you don’t know what you’re signing (another case in point— Jared Leto’s Thirty Seconds to Mars).

SAMRO isn’t (that) bad…

For a bit of an outsider to the industry, I did not know what SAMRO (Southern African Music Rights Organisation) was. But I could tell from the comments and questions it is an organisation whose relationship with musicians is akin to that of Jacob Zuma with South Africans. “Where is my money?” was the audience’s collective question, which CEO Mark Rosin attempted to answer using the operational structure and logistical challenges SAMRO faces in a third world country to justify its reputation. The crowd seemed only semi-convinced of Rosin’s effort to acquit SAMRO. One of these was an attendee whose suggestion for SAMRO to adopt blockchain technology to track artists and their earnings more accurately, was taken a little too lightly by Rosin for the guest’s taste. The attendee happens to work for a company that uses this technology for sustainability.

Connective tissue

Since we have touched on all the other subjects of life, why not Biology? This is my own analogy to characterise what I think may be the biggest takeaway from the conference: South Africa lacks connective tissue, which is the life blood of a high-functioning art industry. We need to collaborate more, understand our strengths, and join forces to become more powerful. Instead of using idealistic phrases like these with no backing, the conference showed attendees what the anatomy of collaboration looks like on the ground, using Trevor Jones and Siphokazi Jonas as, yet another, case in point.

Music Exchange 2022: Poet Siphokazi Jonas and composer Trevor Jones collaborate
Music Exchange 2022: Poet Siphokazi Jonas and composer Trevor Jones collaborate

We got to hear Jonas read her poetry, before hearing it a second time with music that Jones had chosen to accompany it. He explains “I walk into walls while walking, I leave food to burn all while I am thinking about your poetry and how to make it work with my music”. The experience was heightened, and the tone of the poem changed dramatically with the London Symphony Orchestra booming out the speakers in synch with Jonas’ empowering voice. Both pieces of work are brilliant alone, but unforgettable together.

Coming from an Economics background, I have written a lot here about the prospects in the industry for South African artists, perhaps at the expense of replicating the inspirational tone of the conference. But rest assured, it could be felt through each anecdote, laugh and conversation that undoubtedly involved a cross-pollination of ideas. There really is no other opportunity that I know of that offers this level of engagement, advice, inside-knowledge and look into the lives and careers of some of the world’s most phenomenal creatives.

Luckily, Music Exchange (MEX22) is traveling to Johannesburg this coming weekend on the 12th and 13th of November. 

If you are an artist, go. If for some reason you can’t, take this notion with you: There is money in art. There is also money in information, whether it’s how the industry is regulated or how two South Africans successfully collaborated. Scoring Notting Hill, and paying bills are not mutually exclusive.

Contact details:
Rachel Reynolds

CEO of SAMRO – Mark Rosin to give keynote address at Music Exchange on 5th Nov

In a major coup for Cape Town the CEO for SAMRO is speaking at #MEX22 on Sat 5th Nov

Mark Rosin is the Southern African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO) Chief Executive Officer (CEO). 

Rosin assumed the top position in February 2020. Mark will speak about SAMRO and the Road map forward – The detailed Programme is below

Mark Rosin
Mark Rosin

Mark holds an LLB specialising in corporate, media and entertainment law from the University of the Witwatersrand.

Rosin’s career in media and entertainment spans more than three decades, during which he has represented South African and international music industry clients in litigation and commercial matters. As an attorney he represented music publishers, composers, recording artists, recording companies, live concert promoters and visiting international artists.

From 2011 until the first quarter of 2019, Rosin was employed by eMedia Investments, home of e.tv, eNCA and Openview in various roles, holding the position of Group Chief Operating Officer since 2014.

Prior to his appointment at SAMRO, he was operating as a freelance legal and business affairs consultant.

Under Mark’s leadership, SAMRO has seen a significant increase in revenue from music users, in part because SAMRO signed more favourable contracts with them. This has resulted in higher royalty payouts to our members.

Music Exchange programme and topics for Cape Town on Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th Nov 2022

#MEX22 Cape Town
#MEX22 Cape Town

We have the great pleasure and privilege of presenting the speakers and topics for the Music Exchange 2022 (#MEX22) conference.

The emphasis is on Exchange – Arrive to engage and ask questions of all the speakers and meet fellow creatives. You never know who is in the room. You have read about our keynote speakers over several weeks, Marc Marot and Dr Trevor Jones, and now we are pleased to share the balance of our Cape Town programme.

https://www.bizcommunity.com/Article/196/443/232590.html

All the speakers have a lived reality and are actively invested in the local and international entertainment economy.

Special Celebration with Sipho Mabuse 11 Nov 2022 at Leano Restaurant

Special Celebration with Sipho Mabuse 11 Nov 2022 at Leano Restaurant
Special Celebration with Sipho Mabuse 11 Nov 2022 at Leano Restaurant

An extraordinary gathering, down memory lane as we celebrate the LEGEND’s birthday with Sipho Mabuse.

Sipho is regarded as a multi-instrumentalist with a charismatic presence, for more than 50 years …  Come honour the man  for  his pioneering contribution to the music industry.

Venue:  Leano Restaurant & Live Music – 81 De korte Street Johannesburg 

Friday 11th November 2022 – 7.30pm 

Tickets from Quicket or the door.

MEX22 set to welcome Marc Marot, the former Managing Director of Island Records 

South Africa’s premier music, film and entertainment programme returns to Cape Town between Saturday 5th and Sunday 6th of November 2022, at the Academy of Sound Engineering (ASE) – with one of the world’s most respected names in the business, Marc Marot.

One week later, the conference moves to Johannesburg on Saturday, the 12th and Sunday, the 13th of November, at ASE JHB to further amplify its broader intent to connect and covert conversations into commercial success for all in attendance. 

Celebrating its 12th-anniversary MUSIC EXCHANGE 2022 (#MEX22), is proud to announce no less than two multi-disciplined masters, all highly sought-after and hugely respected entertainment industry moguls and speakers, who will be jetting in as special guests of South Africa’s definitive entertainment economy indaba.

Delivering this year’s keynote address, along with Dr Trevor Jones, is Marc Marot.

Marc Marot

Marc began his professional career in 1982 as the ‘Professional Manager’ of UK Independent music publisher, Eaton Music ltd, working with film composers George Fenton, Carl Davis and Henry Mancini and pop groups including Status Quo.

He was appointed Managing Director of Chris Blackwell’s Blue Mountain Music in 1984, working with U2 and the reggae catalogue, amongst others. 

He had his first international #1 single with “Pump Up the Volume”.

Marc’s publishing signings include, amongst many others, Massive Attack, De La Soul, Julia Fordham, and Shakespeare’s Sister (Marcy Levy).

He headed every division of Island until Marc was appointed MD of Island Records in 1990, the youngest MD in the UK music industry at the time.

Amongst the Artists signed and developed by his team while at Island Records were:

Pulp

PJ Harvey

The Stereo MCs

P.M. Dawn

The Cranberries

Elbow

Chaka Demus and Pliers

NWA

The Orb

Ice Cube

Talvin Singh

Tricky

Nine Inch Nails

During his tenure as Island Records MD, Island artists won the prestigious Mercury Music Record of the Year prize three times, and ten Island albums were short-listed. Artists signed during the period have subsequently gone on to win 25% of all the prizes awarded in the 20-year history of the competition.

He guided U2’s career throughout the 1990s, from the release of Achtung Baby to just before the release of All You Can’t Leave Behind, selling close to 60 million albums in the process.

In 1998 he introduced Bono to the concept of Third World debt relief via his involvement in the ‘Jubilee 2000’ campaign and oversaw the ‘drop the debt’ initiative from within the music industry. Bono has subsequently thanked him on both the stage of the MTV awards and whilst addressing the UN council chamber in New York.

To date, acts discovered or managed by him have notched up 38 Top 10 singles, including 18 #1 singles in the UK charts. He has been responsible for more than a million album sales in one form, including his 10 years of direct international responsibility for U2’s marketing and sales.

Upon leaving Island records in 2000, he produced and oversaw the design and implementation of the multi-award winning U2.com, following a successful $5M fundraise. 

U2.com remains one of the most successful music sites on the web, with over 1.4 million registered users and 140 000 subscription-paying customers.

Since setting up his first management company Terra Firma Ltd, his clients have included:

Richard Ashcroft

Lemon Jelly

Audio Bullys

Paul Oakenfold

Yusuf Islam (formally known as Cat Stevens). Islam’s comeback album, Another Cup, sold 850,000 copies worldwide under his supervision.

Marc acted as music supervisor and (music) producer on many film soundtracks, from Angel Heart, Mississippi Burning, and In the Name of the Father (client Trevor Jones and Bono), to the soundtrack for Notting Hill, which sold over four million copies.

He also signed a soundtrack deal for Guy Richie’s Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, which sold over a million copies worldwide.

In 2007, he was appointed as the exclusive music supervisor of the Isle of Man government’s film fund’s commercial arm, CinemaNX. 

Recent credits have included the award-winning films Heartless, The Disappearance of Alice Creed, Me, and Orson Welles and the 2011 box-office record-breaker, TT3D Closer to The Edge, one of the UK’s highest-grossing cinema documentaries to date.

While managing Paul Oakenfold, he worked on eight #1 USA box office movies, including The Matrix, Swordfish and Collateral.

In 2008 he sold his management company to Dutch-based ‘Sports Entertainment Group (SEG), accepting the position of CEO.

The company managed over 400 athletes, including former UK premier division football superstars Robin Van Persie and Thomas Vermaelen and 25 entertainers, including The Noisettes, Leftfield, William Orbit, Gabriella Cilmi, and Billy Ocean, as well as emerging UK talents ShyFX, and Breakage.

In January 2012, he resigned from SEG and accepted the position of Executive Chairman of The Crown Talent and Media Group Ltd.

The company exclusively managed the careers of several highly influential artists and athletes, as well as interests in artist management, music publishing, touring, event management, TV and film production and a model agency.

Marc had around 100 personalities under management, including Ella Henderson, Union J, Luke Friend, Becky Hill, Tamera Foster, TV presenters Susy Perry (BBC) and Hayley McQueen (SKY), as well as former Formula One™ Driver Max Chilton. His football management wing had 49 players under management.

All of which guarantees an opening address delegates will relish while setting the tone and celebrating the gravitas of MEX22’s promise to deliver content and conversation beyond compare.

With more names to be revealed in the build-up to #MEX22, this year’s conference looks to be its most significant and engaging one yet.

With thought leaders and activators from the worlds of art, radio, poetry, production, streaming services, record companies and live eventing, #MEX22 has all the bases covered to deliver, share, and empower everyone who takes up a ticket to attend. 

Stay tuned to our website to get the latest updates.

Tickets sales are now open and available from Ticketmaster 

For more information, contact: Martin Myers @ martmyers@gmail.com